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Fever Reducers- Medical Mischief

This piece was inspired by the rapidly spreading Swine Flu virus and the fact that most victims will reach for a fever reducer (NSAID) at the first sign of illness. But what is that fever there for? Most people instinctively know that the body generates a fever in order to control a viral or bacterial infection. So why do we insist on handcuffing the immune system by artificially halting the fever? Who told you to do that? Hopefully this article will make you think twice before you perform this completely unnatural and counterproductive act.

Note: On febrile seizure: Researchers have found that prolonged hyperthermia (elevated body temperature) does “open” the blood brain barrier BBB), which is an intricate system of cells designed to protect the brain from the invasion of certain substances and organisms. Febrile seizures could then be caused from the virus that is inducing the fever or as a consequence of the increased flow of substances across the the BBB into the brain. (Read the rest below).

Important Links (below)- Here are some links that support the idea that fever is an important component of our immunity and that our routine suppression of fever does significant harm.

Fever Reducers- Medical Mischief

by Dogtor J

©2009 DogtorJ.com

This piece was inspired by the rapidly spreading Swine Flu virus and the fact that most victims will reach for a fever reducer (NSAID) at the first sign of illness. But what is that fever there for? Most people instinctively know that the body generates a fever in order to control a viral or bacterial infection. So why do we insist on handcuffing the immune system by artificially halting the fever? Who told you to do that? Hopefully this article will make you think twice before you perform this completely unnatural and counterproductive act.

“Hi, this is Mrs. Jones. My child, Amy, is a patient of Dr. Smith. She came home from daycare this afternoon with a temperature of 101.5 and I am wondering what to do.” How many calls like this one go out to pediatrician offices every single day, especially in the fall and spring when the seasonal “bugs” start getting passed around?

A registered nurse brought her pet into the office the other day and we were discussing the variation in body temperature among the different species of animals and the role this played in zoonotic diseases (those transmitted from one species to another). She was fascinated by the idea that dogs and cats didn’t get our viral diseases partly because their body temperature (100-102 degrees F.) was so much higher than ours (97.5- 98.8 degrees F., according to Mayo) while humans were often subject to viral diseases from animals (e.g. Avian Flu, Swine Flu, West Nile Virus, Equine Encephalitis) for the same reason. I reminded her that the average human body temperature of 98.6 F. is a protective temperature against most human viruses, which generally prefer a subnormal temperature in order to invade the host.

This fact helps to explain the old “get a chill, catch a cold” idea, which is only true if there is a virus afoot to take advantage of the individual’s weakened state. It also sheds light on the origins of the “cold and flu season”, typically beginning when the ambient temperatures drop in fall and early winter. If we don’t take appropriate measure when this happens (e.g. dress warmly), our body temperature can drop, opening the door to the next available virus. “But what about summer colds?” some ask. Two words: Air conditioning. (Of course, the immune status of an individual is much more involved than their ability to maintain a proper temperature but persistent subnormal body temps have been linked to a number of disease conditions.)

So, because viruses enter and thrive in a body experiencing a subnormal temperature, a virus from a higher temperature animal jumping into a lower temperature human makes much more sense than the other way around. After all, what virus “in its right mind” would want to jump into an individual with a fever? Which brings up another point: Our normal body temperature is designed to help protect us against most viruses. A fever is even more so, helping to ward off other viruses trying to invade the individual in their weakened state. If this weren’t the case, the term “double pneumonia” (which classically means both lungs are involved) could take on a whole new meaning (more than one virus or bacteria involved).

As our discussion progressed, I sensed that this veteran nurse had actually seen the importance of the fever for the very first time. All of this talk of viruses and normal versus subnormal body temperatures had awakened her common sense. So, I asked her the question: “Well let me ask you: If I was the father of child who had just come home with a fever from some daycare plague and I called 100 pediatrician offices in our city today, how many nurses would answer by saying ‘Give her a little Tylenol, monitor her temperature, and if her temperature gets above a certain level or these particular symptoms arise, then give us a call back or come in’.” She quickly answered, “All of them! That’s what I say all of the time!” I then asked, “And what was the first thing the parent is told- kill the fever with Tylenol, right?” She gasped, “Oh, my gosh! I’ve been doing this for 18 years. No telling how many people I’ve told that to!” She was genuinely repentant, having finally seen the truth: Our body knows exactly what it is doing.

But as the fog from her formal training was lifting, she had a few more questions. “What about when the fever gets too high? Can’t it do brain damage? What about febrile seizures?” I started by asking her if she thought our immune system knew what it was doing. She agreed that it did. So I inquired “Why then do we think the fever causes the seizure rather than the virus itself, which caused the fever?” She agreed that made more sense.

To reinforce this idea, I told her about heat stroke in dogs, the tragic result of leaving a pet in a hot car, in which we do attempt to resolve their hyperthermia as quickly as possible. Some of these pets have temperatures that are literally off the scale. We slip a thermometer into them and it pegs at 107 in two seconds. Only God knows how hot some of these poor dogs are. And yet, I have never had one seize and those that managed to recover did not show overt signs of permanent brain damage. Those that died usually passed away from consequences related to their internal organs being horribly over-heated by that unusually hot car interior, often reaching 110-140+ degrees F. (which can happen on a 75 degree day). But this sort of dramatically elevated core temperature is not something that is going to occur with a typical viral or bacterial infection. After this example, it seemed clear to both of us that the conventional seizure-fever connection was a bit backwards: The seizure is more likely to be a sign that a virus has entered the brain- and a therapeutic step to contain it.

We talked a little more about the viruses and bacteria that can affect the central nervous system and how the fevers that accompany meningitis and encephalitis were usually some of the highest body temperatures we experienced (e.g. West Nile Virus). Yes, the more critical infections generally create the highest temperatures, once again underscoring the importance of fever. I sometimes wonder how many people who died from West Nile Virus infection might have survived had they not artificially reduced the initial fever.

In order to help defend her new pro-fever philosophy, I suggested that she might want to go home and Google “fever” or “physiology of fever” for a refresher course on the cascade of events that occurs in our body following the rise in body temperature and the proven benefits of fever, including increased proliferation of white blood cells, increased mobility of and pathogen consumption by those cells, suppressed bacterial toxin production, and increased interferon production. Interferons are proteins (glycoproteins called cytokines) produced by cells that signal other cells of the immune system to get involved in viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections- activating killer cell and other white blood cells and helping to make host cells more resistant to the invasion. A little technical for some but I throw out the “med-speak” because I firmly believe that people need to get a feel for the intricacy of our body’s functions and see that it knows exactly what it is doing when it comes to generating a fever.

But when the reader does do their homework, they will find some articles that continue to state the benefits of fever as being “controversial”. To whom, I would like to know, are these proven benefits controversial…the drug companies, perhaps? There should be no controversy among health care professionals and, yet, they are the ones who are blindly disseminating this misinformation. Hey, I used to do the same thing so I cannot throw stones here. Not only was I the first to take my NSAID-of-choice at the first sign of a virus but we as veterinarians were supplied with an injectable form (dipyrone) to give to pets running fevers. This idea of killing fevers was instilled into us all- laypeople and doctors alike- years and years ago. How did that happen?

What happened to the days of yore when an unfortunate soul in the wagon train became stricken with “the rheumatism” and was wrapped in blankets and sat down by the fire to sweat it out? Yes, they encouraged the fever, which is exactly what we do instinctively. I don’t know anyone whose instinct tells them to jump into a tub of ice water when that fever hits. No, we jump into bed- often fully clothed because the chills are so bad- and pile as many blankets on top of us as we can muster to avoid being overwhelmed by the violent shakes (designed to raise the temperature) that accompany the onset of that fever.

And yet, as I was listening to a popular TV personality interviewing a recent victim of the Swine Flu, I heard the unfortunate college student tell of his faithful roommates who kept him iced down during the worst parts of his fever. The interviewer enthusiastically asked how high the fever had gotten. When the student said “102”, the host said something like “Wow! Man, you really have some dedicated friends there.” I wonder how many people listening had the reaction I did, shouting “No, no! Don’t be telling people with swine flu to kill their fever!!!”

I meet people all of the time who, when asked how they are, they reply, “I’m OK, but I’ve been fighting this bug for weeks now. I can’t seem to shake it.” I’ll then bait them by asking, “Well, are you taking something for it?” When they give the typical response that includes the use of fever-reducers, I look ‘em dead in the eye and say “Stop doing that!” Then they get the lecture. For those in the advanced class, I tell them about the root word of “pharmacy”, which is pharmakeia. What does pharmakeia mean? Magic. Yep- now you feel it, now you don’t.

When did we exchange common sense for magic?

Dogtor J

(Romans 1:25)


Note: On febrile seizure: Researchers have found that prolonged hyperthermia (elevated body temperature) does “open” the blood brain barrier BBB), which is an intricate system of cells designed to protect the brain from the invasion of certain substances and organisms. Febrile seizures could then be caused from the virus that is inducing the fever or as a consequence of the increased flow of substances across the the BBB into the brain.

Considering that most children and adults do not have seizures as the result of a fever, we would have to ask whether those individuals who do are prone to seizures in general, especially if the current viral infection itself was not deemed the culprit. In discussing the history of epilepsy with mothers of afflicted children, I have heard about a number of those children with febrile seizures as younger children developing various forms of epilepsy or autism as they got older. Certainly, not all children who have a febrile seizure go on to become long-term epileptics or develop learning disabilities. Statistically, the vast majority do not unless they meet certain criteria (from Epilepsy.com)

But by examining these criteria, I think my point is made for me. They make a specific point of qualifying their statistics by saying “The vast majority of children with febrile seizures do not have seizures without fever after age 5.” They then discuss various risk factors that suggest the febrile seizures were either caused by a significant viral infection of the brain or were related to familial epilepsy.

What I am suggesting is that we not be so concerned that a seizure might accompany a fever that we routinely bring down elevated temperatures with fever reducers. Again, the overwhelming majority of fevers do not result in seizures. But when they do, I contend that the seizure serves a purpose, just like any other symptom, acting both as a warning sign and a therapeutic measure. When we look a little deeper, we may very well see that the seizure is warning us that the individual is prone to seizures and that we need to be looking into possible predisposing factors, such as food intolerance (e.g. celiac disease), food additive sensitivities, or environmental factors.

Remember: Our body frequently offers us numerous warnings of impending illness (e.g. migraines, heartburn, IBS, allergies, pain, insomnia, etc.) and I believe that seizures are no exception. In the case of febrile seizures, they may be telling us that the individual may need their diet and environment examined more closely.

*Important Links– Here are some links that support the idea that fevers are an important component of our immunity and that our routine suppression of fever does significant harm.

http://www.rollingdigital.com/autism/ – Is fever suppression involved in the etiology of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders?

http://www.whale.to/a/west8.html – Is Fear Of Fever Hurting Our Children?

http://healthydevil.studentaffairs.duke.edu/health_info/Fever%20-%20Myths%20and%20Facts.html – Fever- Myths and Facts (from Duke University)

http://www.unhinderedliving.com/fever.html– Fever is Your Friend

http://www.womenshealth.gov/news/english/626528.htm – FDA Adds New Label Warnings to OTC Painkillers

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/551192_3 – Understanding Fever

 
 
 
Just Desserts

These are little tidbits of knowledge I’ve discovered or insights I’ve gained over the years while doing my in-depth studies.For example, did you know researchers have found that nearly 40% of the genetic information in our DNA is viral information? This explains what we call “genetic diseases” including familial and breed tendencies toward food intolerance (e.g. celiac disease), neurological disorders (e.g. epilepsy), and numerous cancers.

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Blogtor J

Welcome to the blog of the new DogtorJ.com. New research into the origin of our medical woes has revealed something startling: As it turns out, we are our own worst enemy. Yes, the Pogo quote of yesteryear found in the title of this article is quite accurate when applied to our medical lives. We love to discuss those things that we call “causes” of diseases even though we often have little clue as to how these things really cause illness. Even medical professionals can have difficulty grasping the true cause-and-effect. But that is understandable once some insight is gained into the true nature of medical training.

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News Flash!

In this section, I will be placing links to the latest breaking news in the food world, including updates on the use of elimination diets to control disease, articles on pet food, the truth about GMO foods and more. I will do my best to balance the bad with the good, but try to remember: Much of this will seem like bad news but at least we know about it now…and can change it!

 

With some of these stories, I will include a link to a blog entry so that you can comment on the article. This idea came to me after reading the first entry, which is a news flash that made my blood boil.

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Today’s Specials
The Epilepsy Diet Made Simple The Origin of Disease Lectins – The Missing Links Viruses – Friend or Foe? Pain, Pain Go Away
 
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Something to Chew On
 

What is the “Leaky Gut”?
The “leaky gut syndrome” is the root of many medical evils once the “big 4” induce it. Read how Italians have survived being a pasta-based society.

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Hip Dysplasia – “Genetics” vs. Diet

As misconceptions go, this is a high-priority item. Hip dysplasia is not what we were taught.

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Epilepsy and Diet

I have been studying “idiopathic epilepsy” extensively since April of 2000. Guess what? It’s not idiopathic anymore. A diet change can cure it!

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The Truth About Pet Food

Dogs and cats are carnivores yet most pet foods are grain-based. Knowing how to read a label is also very important. Does your pet food really have vegetables in it? Really???

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How to Control Epilepsy Naturally
 

I have been successfully treating pets with epilepsy using diet changes alone for nearly 10 years. The results have been astounding. This paper helps to summarize my findings and recommendations.

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We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us
 

This is the first blog placed on BlogtorJ.com (6-24-07) and pretty much covers the gamut of topics – from heartburn to cancer – that are discussed on this Website. The bottom line? Viruses and bacteria are not the enemy. We are! The good news: We do have our health destinies in our own hands.

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Gluten Intolerance and Your Pet
 

This paper is an article I wrote for the newsletter of www.celiac.com when asked about the prevalence of celiac disease (gluten intolerance) in the dog and cat. This condition has been definitively diagnosed in the Irish Setter but not many other breeds of dogs. I will not be at all surprised when we find that it does exist in numerous other breeds… and even the lovable mutt…but as this article explains, that may very well be a moot point. Gluten is only the beginning.

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The Answer
 

This 40-plus page paper is my first major paper, written in 2001 and hurriedly placed on this site on that fateful and tragic day of 9-11. It represents the culmination of nearly two years of research on the subject of food-related disorders and contains an amazing amount of facts that have been hidden from public view concerning this subject. It covers how the “big 4” trouble foods- gluten, dairy, soy and corn- came into being, catapulted into common usage, and became directly involved in most of our serious medical conditions, including epilepsy, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia, ADHD, pain syndromes, depression, and allergies. Severe immune-mediated diseases such as diabetes, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis are also covered.

 

Yes, it is quite long, but it appeared on my computer screen and was placed onto the Web just as it came out of my head. And it is wordy in places. But, as I tell my clients, “There is no law that you have to read it all in one sitting. Think of it as a free, short book rather than a long research paper. It’s all how you look at it, right?”

 

The one thing I can say is that this information WILL change your life…guaranteed!!!

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